MIDDLETON — The Middleton School District is again seeking bond approval, but this time, voters have three individual options, totaling $28.8 million.

The district has tried twice this year to get bond funding for a new elementary school and other projects. The measures fell 7 percent and 8 percent short of the two-thirds majority needed to pass.

This time around for the Nov. 6 election, the district is breaking its request into three parts:

  • $23.6 million for a new elementary school;
  • $2.75 million for security updates districtwide;
  • $2.36 million for future building sites.

Combined, the three separate bonds represent what the district requested in two previous failed attempts. This time around, voters will have the option of voting for or against each individual piece. Each bond requires a two-thirds majority to pass.

The district broke the $28.8 million bond into three parts due to feedback following previous elections, which showed voters wanted to know how the money would be allocated, according to assistant superintendent Andy Horning.

“So we basically broke it down ... we thought maybe breaking them down into three separate questions would allow them to have an option as to which one they wanted to vote for and which ones they did not,” Horning said.

Should one or all of the bonds pass, the district’s property tax levy rate is projected to stay at $445 per $100,000 of taxable property value. The rate would stay the same because of the increased number of homeowners to share bond cost and the rising property values, according to Superintendent Josh Middleton.

Each bond would be paid back over 20 years, and the anticipated interest rate for each bond is 3.45 percent per year.

The district still has about $40.5 million of the $51.9 million left to pay from the bond passed in 2008 to fund the construction of Middleton High School.

Voters can cast votes on all, some or none of the bonds.

“We’re still hopeful that all three will go through,” Horning said. “I think it’s just allowing our voters better information.”

QUESTION ONE

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The first question seeks approval of a $23.6 million bond to build a fourth elementary school, slated for a 15-acre site on Purple Sage Road with an aim to open in August 2020.

The bond would secure funding for site work and supporting infrastructure, furnishing and equipment.

The district is expecting to grow by 1,000 students in the next five years, from 4,000 students this year to 5,000 students by 2023, Middleton told the Idaho Press in August, citing a 2017 demographic study by Davis Demographics.

Should the bond pass, its portion of the district’s property tax levy rate would be an estimated $90.26 per $100,000 of taxable property value.

QUESTION TWO

The second question seeks approval of a $2.75 million bond that will address two things: financing safety and security updates to all existing schools and renovating Heights Elementary School, the district’s oldest school that sits at 152 percent capacity with about 600 students. It was originally intended to house 396 students, according to the district website.

The district has three elementary schools — Heights, Mill Creek and Purple Sage. Mill Creek is also over capacity.

Should the bond pass, its portion of the district’s levy rate would be roughly $10.48 per $100,000 of taxable property value.

{p class=”c10”}QUESTION THREE

The third question seeks approval of a $2.36 million bond to secure property for future developments to prepare for more growth in the district.

The district wants to secure land at current prices, rather than years down the road when prices could be higher, Middleton told the Idaho Press in August.

Should the bond pass, its portion of the district’s levy rate is projected to be $9.01 per $100,000 of taxable property value.

Savannah Cardon is the Caldwell reporter for the Idaho Press. Follow her on Twitter, @savannahlcardon, or reach her at 208-465-8172.

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