Randy'L Teton

Randy’L Teton, right, public affairs manager for the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and Yvette Tuell, left, a policy analyst in the tribes’ office of public affairs, are shown at the Idaho state Capitol recently after Teton gave a presentation about high school mascots to the Idaho Council on Indian Affairs.

With two Idaho high schools having moved away from mascots depicting Native American people and symbols in the past six months, Idaho tribal representatives said Thursday that they hope a half-dozen others will re-examine their mascots as well. “Basically, education is the key,” said Randy’L Teton, public affairs manager for the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and a well-known national figure since she was the model for gold Sacajawea U.S. dollar coin first issued in 2000.

Teton made a presentation to the Idaho Council on Indian Affairs, which brings together state and tribal leaders, during the council’s meeting at the Idaho state Capitol on Thursday.

Council members praised her presentation, with Gary Aitken Jr., chairman of the Kootenai Tribe, calling it “a great presentation on a very important topic.” Sen. Jim Guthrie, R-Inkom, chair of the council, told Teton, “Appreciate you being here and your passion for protecting your culture and your way of life.” You can read my full story here at idahopress.com (subscription required), or pick up Friday’s edition of the Idaho Press.

Betsy Z. Russell is the Boise bureau chief and state capitol reporter for the Idaho Press and Adams Publishing Group. Follow her on Twitter at @BetsyZRussell.

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