Hemp

Industrial hemp

The Idaho State Department of Agriculture has issued temporary rules authorizing hemp transport, in response to an executive order from Gov. Brad Little, the Capital Press reports. Reporter Brad Carlson writes that the set labeling requirements for hemp receptacles and require drivers to document that the product complies with federal Farm Bill standards.

The temporary rules do not cover hemp production or processing, which current state law prohibits.

Though industrial hemp, which contains less than 0.3% of the psychoactive compound THC, has been fully legalized at the federal level, Idaho lawmakers haven’t passed a hemp-authorization bill, effectively leaving in place a law that treats any THC-containing material as an illegal drug, Carlson writes. As a result, truckers have been arrested in Idaho while transporting hemp.

The temporary rules by ISDA, the state police and state Department of Transportation allow interstate transport of hemp until the state Legislature takes action. Among their requirements: Drivers must sign an affirmation saying the vehicle does not contain illicit drugs; they must have a lawful-hemp verification stating cargo was produced under a state, tribal entity or USDA plan in accordance with the 2014 or 2018 Farm Bill; a lab report is required saying the hemp transported was produced legally under either Farm Bill’s guidelines, meets the federal THC percentage limit and complies with October 2019 USDA rules outlining testing requirements; and a required bill of lading must show shipping contents, lot number, origination and destination and the vehicle’s type and weight. You can read Carlson’s full report here at capitalpress.com.

The Idaho State Department of Agriculture has issued temporary rules authorizing hemp transport, in response to an executive order from Gov. Brad Little, the Capital Press reports. Reporter Brad Carlson writes that the set labeling requirements for hemp receptacles and require drivers to document that the product complies with federal Farm Bill standards.

The temporary rules do not cover hemp production or processing, which current state law prohibits.

Though industrial hemp, which contains less than 0.3% of the psychoactive compound THC, has been fully legalized at the federal level, Idaho lawmakers haven’t passed a hemp-authorization bill, effectively leaving in place a law that treats any THC-containing material as an illegal drug, Carlson writes. As a result, truckers have been arrested in Idaho while transporting hemp.

The temporary rules by ISDA, the state police and state Department of Transportation allow interstate transport of hemp until the state Legislature takes action. Among their requirements: Drivers must sign an affirmation saying the vehicle does not contain illicit drugs; they must have a lawful-hemp verification stating cargo was produced under a state, tribal entity or USDA plan in accordance with the 2014 or 2018 Farm Bill; a lab report is required saying the hemp transported was produced legally under either Farm Bill’s guidelines, meets the federal THC percentage limit and complies with October 2019 USDA rules outlining testing requirements; and a required bill of lading must show shipping contents, lot number, origination and destination and the vehicle’s type and weight. You can read Carlson’s full report here at capitalpress.com.

https://www.capitalpress.com/state/idaho/idaho-issues-temporary-rules-for-hemp-transportation/article_f80b0ae6-1091-11ea-a0b9-1338ff9e564c.html

Betsy Z. Russell is the Boise bureau chief and state capitol reporter for the Idaho Press and Adams Publishing Group. Follow her on Twitter at @BetsyZRussell.

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