Voting 2018, by Brian

Voters go to the polls in this 2018 file photo; Idaho’s May 19 primary election will be the first the state will conduct entirely by absentee ballot.

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The Idaho Press partnered with the League of Women Voters of Idaho to publish these candidate surveys. To search by address for races and issues on your ballot, visit vote411.org.

Idaho State Senate District 12

Gluch, Chelle

Chelle Gluch

Name: Chelle Gluch

Sen. Todd Lakey

Sen. Todd Lakey

Name: Todd Lakey

Questions:

Q: 1. What do you hope to accomplish if elected?

Chelle Gluch: My goals are to help ensure that Idaho children receive a quality education, that our public lands remain public, and to protect the wishes of the voters and protect Medicaid expansion. I also would like to enact some measures to help the working poor of Idaho such as limiting the interest rates on payday loans and encourage our state to participate in the National Housing Trust Fund in order to begin addressing our low income housing crisis.

Todd Lakey: Continue to be a common sense conservative leader in the Senate representing District 12. I have carried legislation to reduce unnecessary regulation and barriers to entry for occupational licensing in Idaho for the past two sessions. The last piece needed involves a regular review of current licensing requirements. I have also carried legislation to more effectively combat human trafficking in Idaho and will be working on further legislation to fight human trafficking.

Q: 2. What experience has prepared you for this office?

Chelle Gluch: I have spent a good deal of the last ten years speaking to the residents of D12 and listening to their stories. I've come to see that many of our citizens are struggling in large part due to the actions or inaction of the legislature who seem to to be disconnected from their constituents. I've struggled with many of the same issues that face citizens, and I understand them. I will work hard to make meaningful change that will benefit everyday Idahoans.

Todd Lakey: I have served in many volunteer and elected positions in Canyon County. I served as a County Commissioner from 1999-2004. I have served in Republican leadership and at the grass roots level as a precinct chair for more than 20 years. I have coached youth sports and volunteer time for my church. I have also served in leadership in the Idaho Senate and currently serve as the Chairman of the Judiciary and Rules Committee. I am also a small business owner.

Q: 3 What changes, if any, would you support related to state funding of public education?

Chelle Gluch: I want an equal, 21st century education for ALL of Idaho's children whether those children live in Driggs, Arco, Nampa, or Boise. I also believe it is time to increase the budget for education funding. Supplemental levies are no longer supplemental but necessary to keep many schools open and running. This is not sustainable, and many Nampa families are being crushed by the tax burdens. It's time to change how we look at education and its funding.

Todd Lakey: I have always advocated for more local control over how funds are spent.

Q: 4. What do you see as Idaho's prison system's most important needs and how would you address those?

Chelle Gluch: The Idaho prison population consists of a good deal of inmates convicted of drug offenses or related charges. While I agree that violent offenders should be incarcerated to protect the public, those who aren't should have a chance at Drug Court, counseling, and true rehabilitation. Rehabilitation and recidivism are directly linked to better long term outcomes.

Todd Lakey: We need to do better at helping those that are released avoid coming back. I think we do a pretty good job of putting the right people in prison and letting the right people out. However, 70-75% of those in the system were in previously and have returned. We have made changes to probation and parole so those officers can be more effective in helping people be successful on parole. Assisting those released with initial housing, employment and transportation are keys.

Q: 5. What do you see as Idaho's most important health care system needs and how would you address those?

Chelle Gluch: I plan to protect Medicaid expansion and the ACA from those who wish to dismantle both programs. All Idaho citizens need healthcare and both of these programs go a long way to meeting those needs.

Todd Lakey: Cost is still a challenging issue. Promoting competition, enabling individuals to make educated decisions about their treatment, allowing them to choose where treatment is provided and then choose the most cost effective option are important.

Q: 6 What changes to income, sales, and property tax policies would you support?

Chelle Gluch: I support no new increases to sales or property taxes. I do support taxing people according to income levels.

Todd Lakey: I always strive to reduce the tax burden on our citizens. Dramatic increases in property taxes have been a major issue with the growth we have experienced in the Treasure Valley. We need to find a better balance between property tax, sales tax and income tax. Property taxes are driven by local government and their elected officials are accountable to the voters. I support reduction in income taxes and removal of the sales tax on groceries.

Q: 7 What measures do you support in updating Idaho's voting processes?

Chelle Gluch: I would like to see all Idaho citizens enrolled in the voting process upon receiving an Idaho drivers license or state identification.

Todd Lakey: Idaho has a good voting system. One of the benefits of the COVID situation has been improvements to our absentee voting process. I support those improvements to the process which make it more efficient for people to request a ballot, vote and then send in their ballot. I supported the legislation that established that in person voting would always be available.

Q: 8. What are the biggest transportation priorities for Idaho in the next 20 years and how should the state prepare now to fund those projects?

Chelle Gluch: As the population continues to grow it becomes more and more apparent that Idaho will need to expand its public transportation options. Idaho cannot continue to ignore this need as it limits the options of the low income and even average citizens. I also believe that the North/South highways in Idaho are in need of both expansion and repair. Funding issues would depend entirely upon federal policies in place at the time.

Todd Lakey: We need consistent funding for transportation. I primarily support a user pay system - i.e. those that use the roads the most should provide the most funding. I also feel that some general fund dollars are appropriate to support transportation. Major transportation corridors and the maintenance and upkeep of existing infrastructure should be our priorities.

Q: 9. Do you support local option sales tax authority for all cities and counties?

Chelle Gluch: No. I think this needs to be uniform across the state.

Todd Lakey: Yes. They should be project specific and end when the project is completed. With those sideboards the voters can decide whether the project is worth a tax increase or not.


Idaho State House District 12 A

Hartwell Pat Day.jpg

Patricia Day Hartwell

Name: Pat Day Hartwell

  • Party: Dem
  • Address: Nampa, 83651
  • Campaign Phone: (208) 681-0480
Bruce Skaug

Bruce Skaug

Name: Bruce D. Skaug

  • Party: Rep
  • Address: Nampa, 83687
  • Campaign Phone: (208) 466-0030
  • Website: SkaugforIdaho
  • Facebook: Skaug for Idaho

Questions:

Q: 1. What do you hope to accomplish if elected?

Pat Day Hartwell: I was born and raised on a Treasure Valley dairy farm. Medical issues are number one to me. The Legislature must also figure out how to get schools back on track. With businesses closed, and people laid off our State is going to be low on tax revenue. Our citizens need to get back to work and they need a living wage when they do. Our businesses need to reopen and grow. We need to protect our public lands, wildlife and fisheries. We must Add the Words.

Bruce D. Skaug: If elected, I will endeavor to prevent any increase in taxes and will work to provide tax relief for homeowners. I will seek to promote free market alternatives and smaller government wherever practical and possible. I will try challenge our public universities and colleges to focus on traditional education, rather than the promotion of ideologies. I will only support legislation that is within the boundaries of the U.S. Constitution/Bill of Rights and the Idaho Constitution.

Q: 2. What experience has prepared you for this office?

Pat Day Hartwell: I have a B.A. in Criminal Justice and for 30 years I was a Crime Victim’s Rights’ Advocate setting up rape crisis hotlines and being a domestic violence advocate. In 1979, 12 programs around the State formed an organization and I was President. We worked to pass laws to aid crime victims including establishing the Idaho Council on Domestic Violence in 1984 which funded shelters. I was elected Chair. We gained passage of Idaho’s Constitutional Amendment to guarantee Crime Victim’s Rights.

Bruce D. Skaug: I have served as an Ada County Deputy Prosecutor as a criminal case trial attorney. I have owned and operated a civil legal practice since 1992 that currently has approximately 20 employees. I am also a senior partner in a land company. I have had the privilege to serve on many non-profit charitable boards as a director. From 2014 to 2020, I served as an elected Nampa City Council Member, four of those years as Council President. My wife, Debbie, and I raised six children together.

Q: 3. What changes, if any, would you support related to state funding of public education?

Pat Day Hartwell: The State legislature has a Constitutional mandate to provide a thorough, adequate education. The State must develop novel funding sources and stop passing this cost on to County property taxes. I would like to find methods to enable students to go on for advanced education without having to going into debt. I support free public pre-K.

Bruce D. Skaug: I would like to see more "school choice" options for parents, including funding for those options.

Q: 4. What do you see as Idaho's prison system's most important needs and and how would you address those?

Pat Day Hartwell: We must continue criminal justice reform. We spend way too much on jails and prisons and incarcerating nonviolent offenders. I support spending less on new prisons and jails, and more on half-way houses and probation and parole officers as well as other early release programs and bring prisoners home from out-of-state. I will back legislation lessening or eliminating minimum sentencing for non-violent drug offenses.

Bruce D. Skaug: There is always room for improvement in the Idaho prison rehabilitation system. I am supportive of rehabilitation options for inmates and funding for such.

Q: 5. What do you see as Idaho's most important healthcare system needs and how would you address those?

Pat Day Hartwell: I want to be a leader in the legislature to ensure everyone has the medical coverage they need. We need to attract more doctors. The last session did not address our citizen’s need’s as far as health care is concerned. I believe healthcare is a right. This pandemic has taught the importance of critical medical treatment and care for others. I support removing the religious exemption that allows parents to withhold critical medical treatment for their children.

Bruce D. Skaug: Access to adequate healthcare is a an issue for all people in Idaho. The more government gets involved in the private practice of medicine, the more expensive and bureaucratic care becomes for the patient. I will listen to the medical community and my constituents in District 12 in seeking solutions to this serious problem.

Q: 6. What changes to income, sales and property tax policies would you support?

Pat Day Hartwell: It is time to remove the sales tax from groceries. I think that is one tax we can all agree on and it helps everyone. Those it helps the most are the low-income, who spend the funds immediately. They put the money back into our economy instantly. I think for year 2021, we might leave other taxes alone, but I have an open mind. My husband and I own a small farm so we certainly aren’t fans of taxes, but the government can’t run on air.

Bruce D. Skaug: I support elimination of sales taxes on groceries. I support a reduction on income taxes. I will be involved in property tax relief for homeowners.

Q: 7. What measures do you support in updating Idaho's voting processes?

Pat Day Hartwell: I believe we need to continue voting by mail and we need to automatically register 18-year-olds on their birthdays. Ballots should be sent out to all registered voters. People shouldn’t have to request ballots. This would increase voting which I believe should be everyone’s goal.

Bruce D. Skaug: In-person voting, with proper voter identification is important for the survival of our Republic. Though absentee voting is acceptable as done in the past, I would not support complete vote by mail elections. Complete voting by mail is too difficult to verify and assure every legal vote gets counted. My mother-in-law never received her ballot this past primary election, even though she was assured her ballot would be mailed to her by the Elections Office.

Q: 8. What are the biggest transportation priorities in Idaho for the next 20 years, and how should the state prepare now to fund those projects?

Pat Day Hartwell: We need a better highway connecting South and North Idaho as well as to complete the widening of the freeway through Canyon County. Federal funds will be required. Although with gas prices declining, gas usage may go up enough to raise some extra income. Idaho is always behind on our road and bridge needs. We do need better and different public transportation in the Greater Treasure Valley including investigating light rail.

Bruce D. Skaug: We still have a serious bridge and road maintenance deficit in Idaho. This deficit is causing safety hazards throughout the state and traffic gridlock in the Treasure Valley. The City of Nampa is unique in that it maintains its own streets, unlike Boise. Nampa had a serious maintenance deficit seven years ago. Over the past few years, Nampa has implemented budget and road maintenance plans that will solve the problem over the next few years. The State can learn a lot from the City of Nampa.

Q: 9. Do you support local option sales tax authority for all cities and counties?

Pat Day Hartwell: I am open to be convinced about this and interested in listening to pro-con arguments.

Bruce D. Skaug: No.


Idaho State House District 12 B

Rep. Rick Youngblood

Rep. Rick Youngblood

Name: Rick D Youngblood

  • Party: Rep
  • Incumbent
  • Address: Nampa, 83651
  • Campaign Phone: (208) 412-5107
  • Website: http://youngbloodforidaho.com
  • Campaign Facebook: Idaho Representative Rick Youngblood

(Uncontested)

Questions:

Q: 1. What do you hope to accomplish if elected?

Rick D Youngblood: Hope to continue serving my home state with the same kind of Conservative servant leadership values I have provided these past eight years. I currently serve as Co-Chairman of Joint Finance & Appropriations Committee and member of Transportation committee. I ask questions about our State Budgets whether some like it or not!

Q: 2. What experience has prepared you for this office?

Rick D Youngblood: Native Idahoan, 40 years of local community servant leadership in Canyon County, 30 years in banking and 10 years private sector. Just competed my 4th term in the House of Representatives. Serve on State Credit Review Enhancement Committee and Governor appointed, Idaho Public Safety Communications Commission.

Q: 3. What changes, if any, would you support related to state funding of public education?

Rick D Youngblood: We have done an excellent job these past five years with increased teacher pay, minimum wage increase, and a new five year salary plan for the next five years. Education was our Governor’s priority these past two years and I stood firm with him. Our universities will figure it out, that if enrollment is down you better bring costs down.

Q: 4. What do you see as Idaho's prison system's most important needs and and how would you address those?

Rick D Youngblood: The challenge is folks in the prison system do not know normal, they were not raised normal. Anything we can do to teach them normal will keep recidivism down. Not for all but for most. Community Re-entry Centers are a great example of putting inmates who meet requirements to work. The program pays for itself and provides needed workers with very few challenges. The current IDOC Director has other similar ideas and they need supported.

Q: 5. What do you see as Idaho's most important healthcare system needs and how would you address those?

Rick D Youngblood: I have been working on these for several years. a) Continue to fully develop (particularly for rural communities) Telehealth care; b) Build on Value Based Care as opposed to Fee for Service, it is working; c) A fully functioning Data Management system using predictive analytics; d) Continue to develop AI processes.

Q: 6. What changes to income, sales and property tax policies would you support?

Rick D Youngblood: All that makes sense. I will not purposely look at increasing any taxes but using existing tax dollars better is a great idea!

Q: 7. What measures do you support in updating Idaho's voting processes?

Rick D Youngblood: Only those that can be secure if on-line with a strong means of verification! I believe that day will come. Otherwise our current process is good. We do need all Idahoans to VOTE!

Q: 8. What are the biggest transportation priorities in Idaho for the next 20 years, and how should the state prepare now to fund those projects?

Rick D Youngblood: WOW, the next twenty years. How about NOW!!! We need consistent funding sources which may require some current General Funding; and opportunity for more local funding decisions. However, not property tax increases. Sources do need to be around those using the local and state road

Q: 9. Do you support local option sales tax authority for all cities and counties?

Rick D Youngblood: Yes, as I believe locals should make those decisions. Folks can always vote No, I know several legislators who are very good at it!

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