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There’s more to life than this.

You think about that, as you go through the motions of your average week. There’s got to be more than housework, routine, a dead-end job, a penny-pinching existence. You know there is – so maybe it’s time to read “Boss Up” by Lindsay Teague Moreno, and seek your more.

You’ve reached a dead-end.

Or at least sometimes, it feels that way. Kids, job, bills, repeat as necessary, didn’t you have dreams once? If being an entrepreneur was one of them, read on.

Says Moreno, this book is for women – mothers in particular – who want to own their own businesses but lack the oomph, the stick-to-itiveness, the self-confidence for it. It’s for women like her own mother, who was an awesome mom and a real-estate agent, and who didn’t blink when Moreno said, at age eight, that she wanted to own a business when she grew up.

To be an entrepreneur, start by knowing the difference between hobby and business, and by knowing yourself. Reconnect with things you love and are good at doing, identify your greatest strengths and weaknesses, and understand how you can work them. Then, read Moreno’s ten “Success Philosophy” chapters she presents for entrepreneurs to read and absorb…

“Think long term” and know how to differentiate your business from others who offer the same kind of product. Be authentic and “stop apologizing.” You have a story to tell, so use it to connect with customers – but tell it consistently by staying on track. Business might wane now and then, but hold onto positivity both inwardly and outwardly. Be teachable and willing to embrace innovation. Never lose sight of “your why” and never forget that your business is a business. And finally, “be S.M.A.R.T” when you set goals, accept when mistakes are made, and don’t give yourself the option to fail. Refuse failure. Simply refuse it.

Which is what readers may do with this book.

There’s no doubt that “Boss Up” may offer certain women a certain amount of business-boost, but others may be overwhelmed by the step-by-step that looks more like a polka than a path. Author Lindsay Teague Moreno offers great advice that’s easy to grasp, but it seems to be all over the place, rather than basics-first. Also missing: some sort of option for a business that’s just not working, an omission that could hurt or discourage first-time entrepreneurs.

The verbiage here is hip and trendy and perfect for its audience of young mothers, but it can also be annoying, with “mom” used as a verb and mild profanity that might bother the Christian audience this book seems to court. Readers should likewise beware that Moreno tells a rather lengthy story about her husband and intestinal problems in a public place, and though it’s presented as hilarious, it’s very much not.

Readers who still want to tackle this book, should: it’s got advice that’s useable, but be aware of what you’re reading. Also know that when it comes to “Boss Up,” there’s more to business than this.

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