This week's IdaHoles is the third and fourth installments in a series on fishing Native lands in Idaho. Our first week's column discussed Jimmy, Spring and Clear creeks in the Fort Hall area, while the last edition of IdaHoles traveled to Duck Valley.

This week's IdaHoles is the second installment in a four-part series on fishing Native lands in Idaho. Last week's column discussed Jimmy, Spring and Clear creeks in the Fort Hall area, while this week's IdaHoles has BW traveling to Duck Valley.

Native lands in Idaho provide opportunities for a variety of fish throughout the state. When traveling on Native lands remember you are in a sovereign, self-governing nation so you must obey all tribal laws and regulations. Some areas are off limits to non-Natives and some have special regul…

The South Fork of the Snake River is one of Idaho's greatest treasures. After its start in Yellowstone National Park, the river flows through the western edge of Wyoming before entering Idaho above the aptly named Palisades Reservoir.

We didn't see any spawning salmon on our latest trip with our own spawn into the wilderness last weekend, but we found a great summer swimming hole. Molly's Tubs, a popular hot springs on the South Fork of the Salmon River is known as a good place for a hot soak. But in the middle of summer?…

Starting at the confluence of Bear Valley and Marsh creeks in the River of No Return Wilderness, the Middle Fork of the Salmon River is one of Idaho's great outdoor adventure attractions-and the fishing is an added bonus. From the historic relics that dot the area to the stories of the peopl…

You know it's hot when the soles of your feet begin to sweat. Beads of perspiration form on your hariline, dripping down the back of your neck. Dunking you head in the city fountain didn't do the trick, and the chlorine and God knows what else has turned your hair green.

Easily accessible, this fishery is open year-round for naturally reproducing rainbow trout. The kokanee season is open from January 1 to August 7 with a limit of 15.

As summer heats the Idaho landscape to a blistering 100-plus degrees, you can be thankful you don't live in Death Valley or Las Vegas, which is experiencing record temperatures this summer. It's still too hot for us northern folk, so it's time for a summer trip to one of the most scorched la…

The headwaters of the shadowy St. Joe gather on the western slope of the Bitterroot Mountains, then flow west to Lake Coeur d'Alene. The river's gin-clear waters and flashing cutthroat trout draw fishermen from across the country.

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