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Sid Enck, Jr.’s tiny house, that he built himself, is filled with the art he and his partner make. Being able to boast a skill level in any one of the arts is impressive but Enck works in ceramics, painting, printmaking, metal, wood working, textiles, videography and photography.

“I’ve got idle hands,” said Enck. “I’ve got to constantly keep working. My grandfather is an interior designer and architect and he introduced me to art at a young age and I’ve just always done it and been inspired by him and being around other artists.”

He has a Zine coming out in December, a group show at a gallery called The Arsenal in California and a huge online store where he sells things all over the country. People can get more information on his website at sacredwheelpottery.bigcartel.com.

After going to art school for videography and photography Enck ended up as a skateboarder, sponsored by Street Plant Skateboards and others for over five years. He even had some shows with Juxtapose but after an injury he started focusing on art more again.

“I found ceramics needing another creative outlet,” said Enck, “and I fell in love with it. I fluctuate with what I work on but ceramics are my main thing.”

He had come through Idaho to do a show at the Garden City Projects in 2018 and ended up wanting to stay. He briefly went back to California and realized he wanted to move back here, build a tiny house and work on art. Lately he’s been interested in decay and abandonment but he said his culture is the main influence of his work.

“Culture and heritage has everything to do with my art,” said Enck. “I’m part Choctaw, Chickasaw and Cherokee, it’s really important for me to have the culture in everything that I do and keep that connection as a focus.”

All of his work is reminiscent of his heritage. He has made what he calls “Pillow Warriors,” sewn and screen-printed puffy style dolls, and his pottery also has screen-printed designs. When making ceramics, Enck works both in wheel throwing and hand building styles. His ceramics are all different — some have a shiny finish, others are dark and look almost sandy but the theme running through all of his art connects it together.

He’s hoping to find galleries in the area to start having exhibits. People can also follow Enck on Instagram at @littlelostindian.

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