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n Jeffrey Baroli and Wendy Simar, both of Parma

  • Kenny Millhouse
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In the Owyhee desert camping, this is the long abandoned Wickahoney Stage Stop.

  • Kenny Millhouse
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In the Owyhee desert camping, these photos are of the long-abandoned Wickahoney Stage Stop.

  • Kenny Millhouse
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In the Owyhee desert camping, this is the long abandoned Wickahoney Stage Stop.

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Kristina Leslie Little and Keith David Smith have announced their engagement and upcoming wedding.

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Licenses issued April 11:

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Marriage licenses issued April 11 through April 15

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Licenses issued on April 4:

Community Information

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While taking a Sunday drive in farm country, a couple has a very loud and unpleasant argument with lots of insinuations about their spouse’s habits. As they passed a herd of jackasses in a field, the husband asked his wife, “Relatives of yours?” She replied, “Yes, in-laws.”

Tuesday was Diabetes Alert Day. And, on this day, the American Diabetes Association gave all of us a wake-up call! Diabetes is one of the fastest growing diseases in the U.S., affecting more than 29 million Americans. Did you know that by eating healthy and keeping active, you may be able to…

n Logan Bennett of Caldwell and Isreal Fuhriman of Nampa

n Shayne Barenberg and Alisha Cawagdan, both from Middleton

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Marriage licenses issued April 11 through April 15

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Boulders shift, canyons erode, old trees fall, new ones grow and tourists crowd Yellowstone National Park, the length of their vacations barely any time at all in the stream of history. A century and a half is nothing in the eons of often violent geology that made Yellowstone. Even so, an exhausting project by a Jackson photographer shows how an ecosystem protected for that long can change in ways obvious and subtle. Brad Boner visited dozens of sites in the park photographed by William Henry Jackson in 1871, the year before Congress made Yellowstone the world’s first national park. Boner painstakingly replicated in color more than 100 of Jackson’s black-and-white photographs. This summer, 40 of Boner’s images go on display next to Jackson’s originals at the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson Hole. During the centennial year for the National Park Service, the exhibit testifies to the success of the world’s first national park, Boner said. “The whole point of creating Yellowstone was to give future generations an opportunity experience these special places,” he said. “When I look at these pictures, I take a great deal of comfort in knowing that my kids are going to be able to go to a lot of these places and see the same thing.” The images show what can change, too: Rock pinnacles at Tower Fall crumble and alter the flow of Tower Creek; the shoreline of Yellowstone Lake erodes dozens of feet in places; the edge of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, where Jackson once stood, collapses into the chasm. Boner took several trips to Yellowstone over the summers of 2011-2014. He spent much time wandering with Jackson’s photographs held up to the horizon. “Things would just sort of click and fall into place. All of a sudden, you’re looking at the landscape that is in the photograph that I was holding, that Jackson took,” Boner said. “There were definitely times I got goosebumps.” Jackson traveled Yellowstone as part of a federally funded expedition to explore and document the area. He carried his photography gear on mules. Taking a photo back then involved exposing images on an 8-by-10-inch glass plate and developing the negative on the spot. “Basically he had to set up his little darkroom every time he wanted to take a picture,” Boner said. Boner had modern digital camera gear but a couple of his trips were plenty ambitious. With a friend, he paddled around the edge of Yellowstone Lake, about 60 miles, in a canoe. Another trip took him, his wife and a friend more than 30 miles over the rugged and remote Mirror Plateau. “We saw bears where we didn’t think we would see bears. We got snowed on in July,” Boner said. Other times his targets, especially grand vistas and thermal features, were heavily traveled. “I’d be standing shoulder to shoulder with a whole bunch of tourists because Jackson had this knack for a picking out the best spot,” said Boner. Boner, a staff photographer for the Jackson Hole News & Guide, plans to publish the images in a book later this year.

On Saturday, May 21, Leslie and Julia (Roper) Pettit of Nampa will celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary with friends and family at 511 S. Bonneville Drive in Nampa. The celebration will be from 1-3 p.m. Immediate family members include their two children, Lesia (Robert) Warden and Vicki …

On Saturday, April 23, Van and Shirley Moser, of Middleton, will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary with family and friends at the Middleton LDS Meetinghouse located at 1749 Willis Road from 6-8 p.m.

Ken and Esther Fish were married on April 7, 1966, in St. Paul, Minnesota. The next day, Ken left for Fort Hood, Texas. Esther shortly joined him. Upon returning in the fall, they had a reception. Ken then left for the 3rd Armored Division, Kirch_Gon’s, Germany. Esther joined him.

Raymond and Mildred (Shimmin) Barrie celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary with their family on April 10.

Here at Zion Lutheran School, we are a small parochial school that educates students using the Classical Christian model. The rigorous curriculum makes achieving the Honor Roll a difficult feat. We are so proud of the eight students that put in the time and effort.